Recitals, Contests, & Awards

When and Where to Meet

When/Where to Meet:

  • APRIL 21, 2014 Recital: 5:00, 6:15, 7:15, and 8:00 PM
  • Recital Location: All recitals are in Burckart Hall.
  • Where to Line Up: Students should quietly line up in the hallway 10 minutes before the recital begins. We will line up in the hallway leading to Janet’s office as opposed to the hallway leading to 214 to help with traffic flow.
  • Ensembles: Those playing in Ensembles should meet at their rehearsal location at 4:30 to review their ensemble (the ensemble rehearsing in BH should meet in the Century House Studio next to Tschida’s Office).
  • Rehearsal in Burckart Hall: If you are wanting to rehearse in Burckart Hall, please email jtschida@mbu.edu to arrange a time.
  • Awards: Unlike previous years, awards will be given out at the conclusion of each recital in an attempt to accommodate everyone’s very busy schedules.
  • DirectionsMap of Old Main and Campus Map

Assigned Recital Times for April 21, 2014:

Listed alphabetical by last name. Note: Duets with other students and Ensembles are listed with an “ENSEMBLE” header.

 First Name Last Name Recital Time
Seth Anderson 7:15
Joseph Anderson 7:15
Jeremiah Boese 6:15
Rebecca Boese 6:15
Jeremiah Boese 6:15
Emily Braun 6:15
Daniela Castellon 7:15
Shani Caves 8:00
ENSEMBLE 

Abigail

Megan

Daniel

Megan

Samantha

ENSEMBLE 

Boorujy

Prigge

Radacsy

MacDonald

Hernandez

5:00
ENSEMBLE 

Becca

Emilie

Rachel

Katrina

ENSEMBLE 

Boese

Hockman

Ratcliffe

Guse

5:00
ENSEMBLE 

Teddy

Nathan

Nathan

ENSEMBLE 

Liu

Hockman

MacDonald

5:00
ENSEMBLE 

Michaela

Katie

ENSEMBLE 

MacDonald

Martin

5:00
ENSEMBLE 

Daniel

Isaac

Jacob

Joy

ENSEMBLE 

Ratcliffe

Liu

MacDonald

Parker

5:00
Angelina Galarza 6:15
Amanda Gracia 6:15
Audrey Grindatti 8:00
Katrina Guse 5:00
Carliann Hepp 6:15
Samantha Hernandez 5:00
Emilie Hockman 5:00
Nathan Hockman 5:00
Megann Hockman 5:00
Donata Jacob 7:15
Aveline Jacob 7:15
Matthew Krmpotich 5:00
Elisabeth Krmpotich 5:00
Mary Krmpotich 5:00
Isaac Liu 5:00
Michaela MacDonald 5:00
Jasmine Maller 7:15
Katie Martin 5:00
Beth Meier 8:00
Alex Meister 7:15
Henry Meister 7:15
Jack Meyers 6:15
Oliver Meyers 6:15
Sarah Milam 7:15
Justine Ostrander 6:15
Valerie Otto 8:00
Maggie Piel 5:00
Rachel Prigge 5:00
Daniel Radacsy 5:00
Daniel Ratcliffe 5:00
Rachel Ratcliffe 5:00
Maiya Reid 8:00
Marri Reid 8:00
Hannah Schroepfer 6:15
Aimee Steggall 7:15
Haley Steggall 7:15
Alyssa Steggall 7:15
Jesse Steggall 7:15
Holden Thielke 6:15
Jared Wehking 8:00
Mason Wehking 8:00
Sofia Wehking 8:00
Nicholas Wolf 6:15
Alyssa Wright 8:00
Lily Yantis 7:15

 

Preparation

Student Preparation:

Students not playing duets must have their recital pieces memorized. Students playing duets need to have their pieces fluently learned. When preparing, students should remember to think about the phrasing, play their piece with the music frequently, check their tempo consistency with the metronome, practice their memory bookmarkers, practice their problems spots until they can accurately play each problem spot 3 or more times in a row, and practice perform for family and/or friends as much as possible.

What to Bring

What to Bring:

  • Families with one student should bring a plate of “finger foods” that do not require refrigeration for the reception time.
  • Families with two or more students should bring a plate of “finger foods” that do not require refrigeration and a 12 pack of a chilled beverage of your choice—soda, juice or water.
  • Please bring refreshments to the tables in the entry way of 2nd floor of Old Main.
  • If, for whatever reason, you cannot bring something, absolutely no problem—but please email me so that we can plan accordingly—jtschida@mbu.edu.

Etiquette Guidelines

Etiquette Guidelines:

  • Students should sit quietly during the recital.
  • Students will not be introducing themselves (programs will be available).
  • Students should start walking up as soon as the audience begins clapping for the performer before them.
  • Students should remember to place their hands on their lap and take a deep breath before playing.
  • At the end of the piece, students should “hold the moment”…(they know what this means), and then place their hands back on their lap.
  • As a courtesy, students need to bow after performing (stand up, take a step forward from the bench, stop, smile, bow for 2- 3 seconds—the time it takes to say “hippopotamus,” and return to their seat.)
  • No gum or candy allowed during the recital.
  • Rings that clink while playing need to be removed.

What to Wear

What to Wear:

Students performing should wear a nice outfit – one that they would wear to a church service or a school concert (please see general policies online for specific concert dress guidelines below). Also, students performing should be sure to trim their nails before the recital.

Boys
  • Nice looking dress pants
  • Collared shirt or sweater
  • Dress shoes
  • Ties and Suit Coats are optional
  • No t-shirts, shorts, jeans, tennis shoes or flip flops
Girls
  • Nice looking dress pants, skirts, or dresses
  • Dress shoes
  • No t-shirts, shorts, jeans, or tennis shoes
  • Because of bowing, please avoid low/loose necklines
  • Please avoid hemlines shorter than the top of the knee

Why Participate in Evaluation Programs?

Why Participate in Evaluation Programs?

  • Evaluation programs serve as a motivation for many students. In one program, if students earn a superior rating for three years, they earn a “gold cup trophy.” In other programs, awards are given for the top scorers in each level etc., and awards are given for level achievements. Some students thrive with competition, and there are evaluation programs that give out first, second, and third place awards as well.
  • Evaluation programs help in accountability for student progress. Students regularly participating in an achievement program such as the guild are challenged to attain the next level each year. Some programs are more rigorous than others. We often remind parents that soccer wouldn’t be as much fun if all they did was practice and scrimmage here and there. Soccer players want to WIN a game/tournament. Similarly, we have students in Taekwondo who have earned their black belts. Anyone familiar with martial arts knows that this is a huge accomplishment. We asked the students if they would like doing Taekwondo if they didn’t test at each different level, and they said resoundingly “NO WAY!” Students in music also acquire a huge sense of accomplishment by successfully completing a level in an evaluation program.
  • Both students and teachers greatly benefit from outside assessment. Often, we find that when students realize that an “unbiased” adjudicator is giving them the same feedback as their teacher, they start to follow their teacher’s directions better. Also, as teachers, we look over all of our students’ evaluations carefully. When we see that we are consistently weak in an area, this helps us improve as teachers. So, participation is valuable for both.

Why Do We Pay a Fee?

Why Do We Pay a Fee?

  • Organizations often have rigorous requirements and expectations for their judges. For example, to ensure fair and meaningful evaluation, one evaluation program we participate in requires their adjudicators to successfully complete a performer and pedagogy examination, three weeks of training, and a judging apprenticeship. This same organization covers the adjudicators’ cost of transportation and boarding in addition to payment for adjudicating services. Because of their requirements, similar to the meaning of a black belt in martial arts, when someone shows us that they scored a 90 at level 3 in this program, we know how they play. We can also see their evaluation form to note their specific strengths and weaknesses. Also, do consider the fees of standard martial arts testing or tournament fees for sports when considering the fee for these various programs.
  • In addition to paying the adjudicators, these evaluation programs have headquarters to organize the programs, they pay for testing sites, piano tunings, and official hall monitors.

Why So Many Options?

Why So Many Options?

  • We offer many options for students because we feel each student is unique and needs an option that will best suit his/her needs.

Wisconsin Federation of Music Clubs

Wisconsin Federation of Music Clubs Website

Location:

Hartland Conservatory, Hartland

Date:

First Saturday in February

Cost:

Approximately $42

Brief synopsis of the requirements:

  • Take a Theory Test
  • Piano Solo Event (2 memorized solos)
  • Theory Practice Tests (scroll to the middle of the page)

Timetable:

  • Students participating must indicate their desire to do so by the 2nd lesson of the FALL semester.
  • Students need to have their pieces completely memorized before Christmas Break.
  • Students must resume lessons one week early during the winter semester.

The National Piano Guild

National Piano Guild Website

Location:

Hosted at Maranatha in the Spring

Date:

April 11th and 12th. 

Schedule:

Click Here for the 2014 Guild Schedule  (2015 Schedule will be posted in late March)

Cost:

$42 (this flat rate amount is billed to your account)

Brief synopsis of the requirements:

  • Memorize only 1 or up to 20 pieces
  • Play scales, cadences, chords, and arpeggios (depending on level) in the key of the memorized pieces.
  • Optional: substitute a memorized piece for a musicianship phase such as sightreading, ear-training, improvisation etc.

Guild Timeline:

By Feb 10
  • Paid Fee: $42 (please make a separate check payable to Maranatha Piano Prep School with “guild fee” as the memo)
By Feb 18
  • Pieces must be learned.
  • Students must have access/own the originals.
By March 4:
  • Pieces MUST BE memorized and Student must own or have access to the original music.
By March 31:
  • Type a list of the pieces that you will be playing in the order that you plan to perform. Be sure to list the name of the piece, the book the piece is in, and the key of the piece (feel free to edit the list your teacher made for you). You can use this form if the pieces are listed in the correct order.
  • Print off two copies of the list (one for yourself and one for your judge)
  • Erase extra marks in your music if possible.
  • Neatly number the measures in pencil (remember, only number the complete measures).
  • Place large “post it” notes upside down on the first page of each piece (as a bookmarker) with the title of the piece written on the part of the post it note sticking out at the top.
  • Attend a Guild Practice at Maranatha date and time TBA (meet in Old Main 214)
  • ACADEMY PARENTS: If your students are performing during the academy school day, you need to send a note to the principal asking your students to be excused at least 15 minutes before their scheduled performance.

On the Day of Your Audition:

  • Bring 2 copies of your list of pieces, and bring your original music (copies will disqualify you).
  • Please arrive at least 15 minutes before your scheduled time.
  • Please wear recital dress: no jeans and/or tennis shoes (what you would wear to a special church service or concert).
  • Please treat the judge and hall monitors respectfully.
  • No candy and gum.
  • Please make sure your nails are trimmed appropriately.
  • Take your time-breathe and think before you play.
  • Place your hands on your lap and take a deep breath between each piece.
  • If the judge claps, please stand up and bow (bowing is a courteous way of saying “thank you for clapping”)
  • Remember: the judge is not required to hear all of your pieces.

Guild IMMT Requirements:

  • Elementary A: None
  • Elementary B: Scales of pieces programmed, one octave HA; Cadences of pieces programmed: I-V (V7)-I, root position HA
  • Elementary C: Same as Elementary B
  • Elementary D: Scales of pieces programmed, one octave HT; Cadences of pieces programmed: I-V (V7)-I root position HT
  • Elementary E: Scales of pieces programmed, two octaves HA; Cadences of pieces programmed: I-V-I and inversions HA
  • Elementary F: Scales of pieces programmed, two octaves HA; Cadences of pieces programmed: I-V-I and inversions HT
  • Intermediate A: Scales of pieces programmed, two or more octaves HT MM 60 to the quarter (play as eighth notes); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V (V7)-I root position HA
  • Intermediate B: Scales of pieces programmed, two or more octaves HT MM 72 to the quarter (play as eighth notes); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V (V7)-I root position and 1st Inversion HT
  • Intermediate C: Scales of pieces programmed, three octaves, HA MM 60 to the quarter (play as triplets); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V (V7)-I and inversions HA
  • Intermediate D: Scales of pieces programmed, three octaves, HT MM 60 to the quarter (play as triplets); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V (V7)-I and inversions HT
  • Intermediate E: Scales of pieces programmed, three octaves, HT MM 72 to the quarter (play as triplets); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V (V7)-I and inversions HT
  • Intermediate F: Scales of pieces programmed, three octaves, HT MM 80 to the quarter (play as triplets); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I root position HA
  • Prep A: Scales of pieces programmed, four octaves, HA MM 72 to the quarter (play as sixteenths); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I root position HT
  • Prep B: Scales of pieces programmed, four octaves, HT MM 80 to the quarter (play as sixteenths); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I and inversions HA
  • Prep C: Scales of pieces programmed, four octaves, HT MM 92 to the quarter (play as sixteenths); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I and inversions HT
  • Prep D: Scales of pieces programmed, four octaves, HT MM 100 to the quarter (play as sixteenths); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I and inversions HT
  • College A B C D: Scales of pieces programmed, four octaves, HT MM 112 to the quarter (play as sixteenths); Cadences of pieces programmed: I-IV-I-V-V7-I and inversions HT

The Music Development Program

The Music Development Program Website

Location:

Hosted at Maranatha Piano Prep School or Hartland Music Center

Cost:

Depends on the level—See Fees

Brief synopsis of the requirements:

  • Complete a Practical Piano Comprehensive Exam including 4-6 memorized pieces, 1-2 etudes, technical requirements, ear tests, and sightreading.
  • Complete a Theory Test (not necessarily on the same day or same year).

Timeline for Participants:

  • Decide on Participation by October 10.
  • Please email janet.tschida@mbu.edu indicating your intent to participate.
  • Choose a level and become familiar with the requirements for your level by October 17.
  • Purchase Books by November 1. Please check with your teacher to find out if you need to purchase the 4 star sightreading and ear training book, the repertoire book, the technique book, and the etude book for your Level (if you are in levels 1-10).
  • Finalize Repertoire by December 1.
  • Register by January 15.

To Register:

  • Enter the requested candidate information
  • Enter your teacher’s number (email your teacher for this number)
  • Select your examination grade (be very careful to enter the correct level), subject (Piano—Practical Exam), and preferred examination center (272 Watertown)
  • Arrange for an online payment
  • Select an examination time
  • Print a copy of the Confirmation Summary
  • Write down your Confirmation Number for later use
  • Completely fill out the Examination Form by March 1

Teachers:

  • Register for a teacher number (teachers only need to do this 1X).
  • Read through the handbook’s general information and the requirements for the levels your students are entering.
  • Determine their students’ level (Students must be in at least level 2A for the preparatory A.
    Please choose the level based on the pieces the student is currently studying.).

Wisconsin Association of Christian Schools

WACS Website

Location:

Calvary Baptist Christian School, Watertown

Run off Dates for Watertown:

  • Date Unknown: WACS Academy Run Offs at MBA
  • Jan 16-20: Junior/Senior High WACS Run offs at CBCS
  • Feb 16: Elementary WACS Run offs at CBCS

WACS Dates:

  • March 9: Junior/Senior High WACS
  • March 30: Elementary WACS

Cost:

See your band/choir director

Brief synopsis of the requirements:

  • Students must choose to enter one or more of the following categories: sacred, classical, or one piano/four hands.
  • The selection must be memorized (exception: duets).
  • Participants must attend a WACS affiliated school.
  • Students participating need to inform their piano instructor by October 10.
  • Students need to contact their school regarding run-off dates and requirements asap.
  • Students need one original of their music for the judges.

Wisconsin Schools of Music Association

WSMA Website

Location:

Contact your band or choir director

Cost:

Contact your band or choir director

Brief synopsis of the requirements:

  • The selection must be chosen from a specified list.
  • The selection should be memorized.
  • Participants must attend a public school.
  • Students participating need to inform their piano instructor by October 10.
  • Ask your piano teacher about the performance level he/she recommends for you.
  • Students need an original copy of their music for the judge.

Awards Program

Maranatha Piano Prep School offers an excellent incentive program for encouraging students to accomplish goals that aid in becoming a life-long musician. (Because younger students are often more motivated by short term award systems, teachers of younger students may incorporate “prize box” incentives throughout the semester. Prize box incentives are used at the teacher’s discretion and are unrelated to the following.)

Piano Prep

Earning Points:

Points will be earned on a weekly basis. Students will also earn points for accomplishing goals.

Tracking Points:

Points will be tracked on the weekly report forms already being used.

8 Week Segments: The program will consist of three 8-week sessions to…

  • Generate a push in the middle of both semesters rather than just at the end of the year.
  • Allow three “re-start” opportunities.
  • Encourage consistency.

Awards:

  • End of Session Recognition for earning 80 or more points.
  • Gold Award: End of the Year Award for earning 80 or more points for all three sessions.
  • Silver Award: End of the Year Award for earning 80 or more points for two of the three sessions.
  • Bronze Award: End of the Year Award for earning 80 or more points for one of the three sessions.
  • 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place award to the students earning the most points throughout the year.

Weekly Points: 10 Possible

  • Daily Practice Time: 1 point/day
  • Meeting All Weekly Goals: 1 point
  • Bringing All Materials to Lessons: 1 point
  • Arriving On Time: 1 point

Goals Points: 20+ Possible

  • 20 points for every at level goal accomplished.
  • Students may need more than one session to accomplish a goal—the 20 points count for the session in which the goal was accomplished.
  • Choose goals from the list below.
  • Additional goals may be proposed by a student’s teacher.

Options for Beginners Only:

  • 5 Finger Patterns: Learn Only Five 5 Finger Patterns Hands Alone (C G D A F are recommended)
  • Flashcards: Learn the Musical Alphabet Staff Notes Surrounding Middle C in 20 Seconds: A B C D E F G
  • Songs: Learn 10 Songs
  • Progress: Learn to “My Invention” in the Pre-Faber Book
  • Memorization: Memorize any 4 songs from the books
  • Practicing: Practicing 5 days a week for all 8 week

Level 1 Note Recognition: (only available to students in the Pre-Level/Beginners) 
Bass C-Treble G in 
30 seconds without errors

Level 2 Note Recognition: (only available to students in Level 1 or 2a)
 Bass F to Treble G in 
60 seconds without errors

Level 3 Note Recognition: (only available to students in Level 2b and above)
 Bass Ledger Line A to Treble Ledger Line E in 
60 seconds without errors

Symbol Recognition: 
Pink Cards in Hal Leonard Set A
 in 60 seconds without errors

Advanced Symbol Recognition: 
Pink Cards in Hal Leonard Set B
in 60 seconds without errors

Key Signature Recognition: 
12 Major and Minor Keys in 
60 seconds without errors

Memorization: Memorize 200 measures or more

Performance Option 1: Performing for 200 people (recitals do not count)

Performance Option 2: Performing 20 different times for groups of 3 or more

Technique Level 1: 12 Major or Minor 5-finger patterns (only students in Level 1 or below)

Technique Level 2: 12 Major or Harmonic Minor 1-octave scales (only students in Level 2b or below)

Technique Level 3: 12 Major or Minor 2-octave scales, 2-octave arpeggios in root position, cadences in root position, and chord inversions (only students in Level 5 or below)

Technique Level 4: 12 Major or Minor 4-octave scales, 4-octave arpeggios in all inversions, cadences in all inversions, and chord inversions (students no longer using methods)

Scale Marathon Completion at 108 MM: (additional honor: Name on Permanent Piano Prep School Wall Plaque)

Sightreading Option 1: Complete a progressive sight-reading book at the student’s level

Sightreading Option 2: Sightread 120 Pieces

Sightreading Option 3: Sightread 120 Hymns as written or in 5 or 6 part

Chord Root Melodies: Learn the chord root melodies for 24 songs

Theory Option 1: Pass the final at the end of the semester for your Tuesday Theory Class

Theory Option 2: Complete a theory book

Theory Option 3: Complete an online or computer based theory program

Lead Sheet Improvisation: Learning and transposing 16 accompaniment patterns

Chord Progressions: Learning and transposing 16 chord progressions

Music Listening:

  • Listen to 30 minutes of classical music that they haven’t listened to before on a weekly basis.
  • Watch the score if possible, and listening must be active and focused listening (as in not doing other activities while listening).
  • Write 1 paragraph containing a “description” and “reaction” for every 30 minutes of active listening.
  • Complete 4 hours of music listening.

Composition:

  • Must be a minimum of 16 measures
  • Strongly recommend using a piece as a model
  • Must be transcribed in FINALE
  • Must write a paragraph explaining the process used when composing etc.
  • Must be evaluated by two instructors
  • Must implement changes suggested by instructors
  • Must be performed publicly

Orchestration:

  • Must orchestrate a piece from piano repertoire
  • Must be a minimum of 16 measures
  • Must use at least four different instruments
  • Must write a paragraph explaining the process used when orchestrating etc.
  • Must be transcribed in FINALE
  • Must be evaluated by two instructors
  • Must implement changes suggested by instructors

Arranging:

  • Must be a minimum of 16 measures
  • Strongly recommend using a piece as a model
  • Must write a paragraph explaining the process used when arranging etc.
  • Must be transcribed in FINALE
  • Must be evaluated by two instructors
  • Must implement changes suggested by instructors
  • Must be performed publicly