The Water that Divides: Two Views on Baptism Explored, Donald Bridge and David Phyers


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“Things that divide Christians act as a poor witness to the world. On such major schism is that of Baptism. However if we can’t agree, the next best witness to the world is the manner of how we disagree. The two views explored here, paedo (or infant) baptism and adult (or believer’s) baptism are often so entrenched that discussions can be based around prejudice rather than understanding. This classic book aims to eradicate the former and promote the latter.” -Amazon.com

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The Water That Divides: Baptism and Baptists


In an article called “We Believe In: Water Baptism,” Arthur Farstad identifies a problem in the broad evangelical world:

If one were writing an article on baptism for a Baptist publication – or a Church of Christ, Presbyterian, or Roman Catholic one – the task would not be too difficult. Each group has well-defined positions on all aspects of this doctrine. . . . Our readership holds differing views not only on the mode but also the meaning of baptism, and perhaps most important of all, the proper candidates for water baptism. Difficult as it may be, in this article we propose to examine the consensus of nearly all Christians on water baptism.[2]

The Logic Of BRAPSIS


Dr. Richard Weeks, Maranatha’s first academic dean, was also an avid bibliophile and Baptist historian. Well educated, he pastored for several years in Chicago before going to Pillsbury and then Maranatha to teach Baptist Polity and Baptist History, among other classes. Not content with the usual BAPTIST acrostic for the Baptist distinctives, he began a study of the various lists of distinctives identified by a wide variety of Baptist writers—old and new, northern and southern, American and European, and especially Fundamental Baptists of the early 20th century. From this study he created a list of what he thought the key Baptist distinctives were, without trying to force them into an acrostic grid. He also established an order to these distinctives, considering not so much that some distinctives are more important than others, but rather that some distinctives tend to flow out of other distinctives. The result was BRAPSIS2.

The first distinctive, of course, is “B—Bible, the sole authority of faith and practice” in the local church. Other Protestant denominations might object, claiming that they also hold this Read more…