Creation and Blessing, Allen Ross


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“An exceptionally helpful guide for pastors and teachers. Its literary, exegetical, and theological analyses will enrich any exposition of Genesis.” -Amazon

Here are some other books on Genesis that might interest you.

Genesis: A Commentary, Bruce Waltke


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“This landmark commentary marshals the vast experience and brilliant insights of one of today’s most revered Old Testament scholars. To those familiar with the work of Bruce K. Waltke, the significance and value of Genesis will be instantly apparent. Others who are unfamiliar with Waltke have only to read the first few chapters to understand why he has earned the reputation of a scholar’s scholar, and why this masterful volume stands like a monolith among Old Testament commentaries. Exploring the first book of the Bible as ‘theological literature,’ Waltke illuminates its meanings and methods for the pastor, scholar, teacher, student, and Bible-lover. Genesis strikes an unusual balance by emphasizing the theology of the Scripture text while also paying particular attention to the flow and development of the plot and literary techniques–inclusion, irony, chiasm, and concentric patterning–that shape the message of the ‘book of beginnings’. Genesis Models the way to read and interpret the narratives of the book of Genesis Provides helpful exegetical notes that address key issues and debates surrounding the text Includes theological reflections on how the message addresses our contemporary theological and social issues, such as ecology, homosexuality, temperance, evil, prayer, and obedience Addresses critical interpretive issues, such as authenticity, date, and authorship For all the author’s formidable intellect and meticulous research, Genesis is amazingly accessible. This is no mere study tool. Lucidly and eloquently written, it is a work of the heart that helps us not only to understand deeply God’s Word in its context, but also to consider how it applies to us today.” -Amazon.com

Here are several more recommended books on Genesis that you might find interesting

Exposition of Genesis: Volumes 1 and 2, H.C. Leupold


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“Leupold’s classic commentary on Genesis. Two volumes in one. One of my favorite commentaries on Genesis is the tried, but useful, commentary by Leupold. It offers more sense and help on the book of Genesis than one usually finds in similar commentaries on this important book of the Bible. I highly recommend it. Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. President Emeritus Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary Rarely does a commentary have a shelf-life of over 20 years, but H. C. Leupold’s Genesis is a classic exposition whose careful exegesis and theological comment make it a “must have” for every serious student of the Book of Beginnings. Kenneth Mathews Professor of Divinity Beeson Divinity School Best book on Genesis, a very thorough presentation, easy to read. A well researched, evangelical work. An Annotated Bibliography on the Bible and the Church Douglas Moo, Editor A most thorough, helpful exposition from the conservative standpoint.”

– Amazon.com

Here are some other books on Genesis that may interest you

What We’re Reading – Coming to Grips with Genesis


Terry Mortenson and Thane H. Ury, eds. Coming to Grips with Genesis: Biblical Authority and the Age of the Earth. Green Forest, AR: Master Books, 2010.

Although written from a creationist point of view, this work is not a book on science. It  is a hermeneutics and theology book, centered on understanding primarily the meaning of Genesis 1-11. The contention of the book is that if the first eleven chapters of the Bible are not taken literally or are viewed as a non-narrative genre, then the rest of the Bible cannot stand.

The first three chapters look historically at the church’s understanding of creation, the fall, and Noah’s flood. Several following chapters are critiques of various evangelical approaches to Genesis 1-11 — the equating of natural theology with biblical theology, various interpretations of the “days” of creation, the inclusion of “deep time” in Genesis 1, and the argument that massive gaps  in the Read more…